Helping Others in the Family

Helping Others in the Family

An Airman sees first-hand how AFAS helps the Air Force family Growing up with a father as an Airman, Major Kevin Gore loved meeting new people and learning new cultures. When Maj Gore took an aviation course in high school, he was inspired by his teacher to consider a career in the military. With encouragement from his parents, Maj Gore applied to the United States Air Force Academy. With his father’s long service as an Airman, Maj Gore received a presidential nomination, beginning his career in the Air Force. Maj Gore is proud of his service, and he’s proud to be an Airman. For him, it means “an instant connection and willingness to help others in ‘the family.’ ” When Maj Gore was a Captain at Moody Air Force Base in 1992, he saw the younger members of his Air Force family struggle to make ends meet. Contacting the Air Force Aid Society (AFAS) on behalf of these young Airmen, AFAS helped relieve some of their financial burdens during the holidays. Maj Gore saw first-hand that AFAS was a worthy charity. Years later, AFAS was there to help the Gore family. The Gores have six children from ages 18-30, which has meant many college tuition bills over the years. Sometimes there was a shortage of funds, and the Gores had

HERE TO HELP

HERE TO HELP

AFAS Virtual Schooling Grant provides a sense of relief during the pandemic Senior Airman Pamela Poirier joined the Air Force to complete her education and to provide stability for her son. Her Air Force experience has been slightly challenging since she and her son has had to move away from family. “I didn’t have my parent’s support, but I quickly formed a family within my unit that I knew I could depend on,” says SrA Poirier. “No matter the challenges you face, you can always find a family within your unit or base that’ll be there for you, support, and guide you,” she says. She heard about the Air Force Aid Society from a coworker who had applied for an emergency assistance no-interest loan. Due to the pandemic, her significant other lost his job, and her family’s income shifted from a dual-income household to a single-income household. Air Force Aid Society’s Virtual Schooling Grant could not have come at a better time because she needed help to pay for her son’s school supplies. In response to the pandemic, AFAS developed the Virtual Schooling Grant to help Air Force families with expenses by providing $250 to offset virtual schooling costs for dependents in grades K through 12. SrA Poirier applied and received the grant. “AFAS is for Airmen, no matter the

The Backbone of the Air Force Family

The Backbone of the Air Force Family

A veteran sees how AFAS strengthens Air Force families Casandra Dawson’s grandfather is a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps, and he was a major reason why she decided to join the Air Force. Along with serving her country, Casandra wanted to “establish a strong foundation that would help in my pursuit of educational and professional goals,” she states. Casandra served in the Air Force for nine years before separating so that she could provide stability and consistency to her three children. The Air Force continues to be a big part of her life. Her husband is an active duty Senior Master Sergeant, and now Casandra works as a community programs assistant at the Airman and Family Readiness Center at Joint Base Langley-Eustis in Virginia. Over the years, the Dawsons have learned the importance of taking care of Airmen and their families, “and this is why we love and appreciate the Air Force Aid Society (AFAS). Because it’s a service that takes care of our Airmen!” Casandra explains. Calling them the “backbone” of the Air Force family, Casandra says AFAS strengthens Airmen. Casandra has seen first-hand how AFAS takes care of its own. In fact, she’s benefited from its assistance more than once. When she was an Airman First Class, Casandra’s grandpa passed away in Guam when she was stationed

Always Ready to Help

Always Ready to Help

AFAS has been there for Airmen for 78 years Airmen are often miles away from their family, whether it’s in another state or in a different country. If an emergency comes up with a loved one, Airmen may not have the extra money for a last-minute ticket or travel arrangements. The Air Force Aid Society (AFAS) is always ready to help, ensuring Airmen can be with their loved ones when they need to. Lieutenant Colonel Isaac Adams saw this first-hand when he was the Commander of the 728th Air Mobility Squadron in Incirlik Air Base in Turkey. In 2018, a young Staff Sergeant walked into the First Sergeant’s office clearly distraught. The Staff Sergeant’s father had been admitted to the hospital, and he was not expected to live much longer. The First Sergeant arranged for the Staff Sergeant to leave on a military flight that evening. “Unfortunately, Joint Travel Regulation authorized funding for emergency travel wasn’t enough to cover the Staff Sergeant’s flights after he landed in the States,” Lt Col Adams recalls. The flight from Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport to his hometown would more than drain his bank account. Fortunately, AFAS stepped in quickly, allowing the Staff Sergeant to make it home where he was by his father’s side as he passed away. “While his grief was immense,”

Easing One Burden During COVID-19

Easing One Burden During COVID-19

AFAS eases a financial burden for one family during the pandemic Technical Sergeant Jeffery Brown joined the Air Force 12 years ago to get an education. Since then, he’s learned that being part of the Air Force means having more than a job with a paycheck. TSgt Brown has found some of his best friends as an Airman, and he’s found support from the Air Force during the trying times of COVID-19. Having heard of the Air Force Aid Society (AFAS) early on in his career, TSgt Brown never thought he’d need it. But, then COVID-19 happened. Like so many families, the Browns found themselves in unfamiliar waters that presented new challenges. TSgt Brown’s wife works at the Child Development Center at Holloman Air Force Base, but when COVID-19 hit, her hours were drastically cut. Still having all of their regular bills, the Browns found themselves struggling financially. “I was forced to pick up the additional financial burden so we could pay the bills,” TSgt Brown recalls. With the reduced income, it was only a matter of time before the family found themselves coming up a little short. TSgt Brown turned to AFAS to help them through their tough situation. The much-needed assistance allowed the family to get caught up on their bills, giving TSgt Brown the breathing room he

Taking Care of Airmen

Taking Care of Airmen

AFAS takes care of Airmen like family during COVID-19 Technical Sergeant Raymond Ireland wanted more out of life than his small hometown offered. With a father who served in the Army National Guard for over 20 years, TSgt Ireland joined the Air Force at 17 years old with his mother’s permission. Now, 16 years later, he leads a team of people and makes sure they’re his number one priority. For TSgt Ireland, “taking care of your people is what the Air Force family means to me.” This includes how the Air Force Aid Society (AFAS) is always ready to help Airmen when they’re in need. The COVID-19 pandemic has created unprecedented conditions for millions of people. TSgt Ireland’s wife was out of work for a while and the family lost her income.  When she was able to return to work, the family needed childcare but didn’t have enough to cover the initial childcare bill. TSgt Ireland applied for and received an interest-free loan. AFAS went one step further and converted his loan to a grant due to the pandemic and their unplanned financial emergency. AFAS also recognizes many Air Force families have faced extra expenses resulting from school closings due to the pandemic. To help Airmen, AFAS offered a one-time $250 Virtual Schooling Grant to eligible Air Force families with